Conjunction Observing

User avatar
Bsimon
Posts: 272
Joined: Sat Sep 09, 2017 10:14 am

Re: Conjunction Observing

Post by Bsimon » Thu Dec 17, 2020 11:19 am

Of course next Monday too when Jupiter and Saturn will be really close. (Saturday and Sunday are not looking good.)

Barry

Lmccormick
Posts: 49
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2018 12:57 pm

Re: Conjunction Observing

Post by Lmccormick » Thu Dec 17, 2020 10:21 pm

This was from my driveway this evening using a Vixen ED80 & a Canon 50D on a tripod. 1/8 second, 400 ISO. The highest magnification that would fit both planets in the eyepiece was 90x with a Pentax XL7mm and an XL21mm in the 16" f4.5. Not too much different in appearance from the photo.

Lowell
Attachments
2020_12_17_jupiter & saturn_0315 (2).JPG

User avatar
Bsimon
Posts: 272
Joined: Sat Sep 09, 2017 10:14 am

Re: Conjunction Observing

Post by Bsimon » Fri Dec 18, 2020 9:54 am

Nice capture Lowell!

From the park by my home I was joined by John Martinez as well as Ralph Junius, his wife Sandra plus 6 of his granddaughters. Two of my volunteer friends, James and Gary, from the World War II Museum also participated. The park right now has closely cropped grass, virtually like a putting green so this was a very nice surface to set up a telescope. I used my Orion ED 100 f/9 (focal length 900 mm) and Ralph brought and used his TeleVue Genesis. There were no other telescopes. I brought numerous cases of eyepieces so that I could use what I wanted plus have other eyepieces for "non-certified/health unknown guests to use. As it turned out all who wanted to look thru my scope all looked thru the same eyepieces. (Total of 6 people including me.) I used my set of Baader Hyperions and in succession kept upping the magnification until Jupiter and Saturn could no longer fit in the same field. I started with the 31 mm Hyperion (29x), then on to the 21 mm Hyperion (43x) then 17 mm (53x), 13 mm (69x) and the final one to fit both in the same field was the 8 mm (112.5x) which with this scope has a calculated .64 degree field. The next eyepiece down is the 5 mm and it yields 180x and a .4 degree field. I did not really try to see with both Jupiter and Saturn could be squeezed into the same field with this one, but if they could the image quality at the edge would likely not give a good view. The eyepiece was used to show Saturn at higher magnification.

We had a nice view and as close as Jupiter and Saturn were on Thursday night, they will be separated by about 1/4th the separation distance on Monday. That will allow for a much higher viewing magnification.

It was relatively cold, about 50 degrees, but very light wind, so that was nice and the right clothing made the temperature a non-issue. The humidity was also low so that was a plus.

See attached images. Note - click on the image to reveal Saturn, the bright object is the Moon, the other object is Jupiter and when you click on the image Saturn (much fainter) is revealed by Jupiter

Barry Simon
Attachments
Occultation Viewing on 12-17-20 - 2.jpg
Occultation Viewing on 12-17-20.jpg

Lmccormick
Posts: 49
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2018 12:57 pm

Re: Conjunction Observing

Post by Lmccormick » Fri Dec 18, 2020 9:05 pm

I used an AT102 with a Canon T2i Rebel on an EQ mount in the driveway. 1/8 second with ISO at 400.
Attachments
2020_12_18_jupiter & saturn_0333 (2).JPG

Lmccormick
Posts: 49
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2018 12:57 pm

Re: Conjunction Observing

Post by Lmccormick » Sat Dec 19, 2020 1:36 pm

Monday evening is looking good. I'm curious to see if both planets will fit in the field of view of a Canon 50D when attached to a 16"f4.5 scope. The camera has a cropped sensor and won't come to focus without using the 2X barlow. I think the magnification is over 400x with this combination. It's also hard to keep objects in the camera's field of view without tracking. It will be too early to do an alignment for the Servocat to be operational. The moon will be out so that makes it easy to get the camera focused. It should be fun.

Lowell

LPhilpot
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Sep 11, 2020 12:34 pm

Re: Conjunction Observing

Post by LPhilpot » Sun Dec 20, 2020 1:17 pm

We have an emergency software upgrade going on at work Monday, but hopefully it won't impact my ability to see the conjunction tomorrow evening. I have to drive about 20 minutes to get horizons low enough to see it. If work runs long, I'll have to read others' reports.

User avatar
Bsimon
Posts: 272
Joined: Sat Sep 09, 2017 10:14 am

Re: Conjunction Observing

Post by Bsimon » Sun Dec 20, 2020 8:58 pm

I was not expecting a clear sky tonight (Sunday 12-20) so it was nice to have one for at least enough time to see and photograph the conjunction. Seeing was poor and the mosquitoes were bad but Jupiter and Saturn were really close. Tomorrow should be spectacular! Like others have commented on various forums there was an interloper in the line of Galilean moons of Jupiter (between the two closest to Saturn in the photograph).

My photo is not too good. Taken about 1/2 hour after sunset thru an AstroTech 102 EDf coupled to a Canon 60D. The scope has a focal length of 709 mm . If you click on the image here you will just be able to see the "rogue" moon.

Hopefully the mosquitoes will not be too bad tomorrow.



Barry Simon
Attachments
IMG_3949 - Copy - Small.JPG

Lmccormick
Posts: 49
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2018 12:57 pm

Re: Conjunction Observing

Post by Lmccormick » Mon Dec 21, 2020 8:04 pm

Image with dim Saturn taken with 16" & Canon T2i w/ 2x barlow (no cropping). Image showing Jupiter's moons taken with AT102 & same camera and is a cropped image. I found that my best viewing was with a Pentax XL 14mm in the 16" scope (130x). Both planet were in the field of view with a 5.2mm eyepiece but very muddy. It was a nice evening.
Attachments
2020_12_21_jupiter & saturn_0425 small.jpg
2020_12_21_jupiter & saturn_0429 (2).JPG

User avatar
Bsimon
Posts: 272
Joined: Sat Sep 09, 2017 10:14 am

Re: Conjunction Observing

Post by Bsimon » Mon Dec 21, 2020 9:44 pm

My photos tonight are similar to those that Lowell posted. Taken with an Orion ED 100 f/9 using a Canon 60D. The second photo was at prime focus (fl 900) with this one showing Jupiter's moons. The first photo was with the same scope but with a TeleVue 4x Powermate, effectively giving the scope a focal length of 3600 mm. All shots were at ISO 400 and an exposure of 1/6th of a second.

Few photos taken as we had a crowd. John Martinez and I had a crowd of about 50 people who wanted to see the planets, plus a WVUE Fox8 cameraman filmed it all.

Barry Simon
Attachments
IMG_3987 - Copy.JPG
IMG_3978 - Copy - Copy.JPG

Post Reply